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IISc

Bengaluru | Nov 14, 2019
IISc researchers use an anti-malarial drug to increase the effectiveness of anti-tuberculosis drugs

In 2018, around 1.5 million people died from tuberculosis (TB) — an infectious disease that mainly affects the lungs. A major obstacle in the clinical treatment of TB is the long therapy time required to clear the infection. An infected patient needs to take antibiotics for over 6 to 9 months to prevent a relapse — a duration so long that many discontinue their medications.

General, Science, Health, Society, Deep-dive
Bengaluru | Nov 8, 2019

Imagine just switching on your lights and downloading a movie in a second. The world demands high-speed internet connectivity at a lower price. This increasing clamour for speed and bandwidth is opening up new avenues, and one such evolving domain is LiFi - a wireless technology that makes use of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) to transmit data. Light waves are 10,000 times denser than WiFi signals, so there is vast untapped potential here.

General, Science, Technology, Deep-dive, Friday Features
Bengaluru | Oct 31, 2019
Establishing an order within chaos

Study shows how paper wasps use the space in their nests to feed their larvae and fend off diseases.

General, Science, Ecology, Deep-dive
Bengaluru | Oct 10, 2019
How did the iconic blackbuck evolve? IISc scientists find new insights

The blackbuck is an antelope species native to the Indian subcontinent. Although the term 'antelope' is loosely used to refer to many ruminating ungulates, the blackbuck is the only animal that belongs to the genus named Antilope. True antelopes belong to one of the four genera—Gazella, Nanger, Eudorcas and Antilope. Scientists are still debating the evolutionary relationships between these members. In a recent study, researchers at the Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru, have traced the evolutionary relationships of the blackbuck (Antilope cervicapra) using phylogenetics. The study was published in the journal Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution.

General, Science, Ecology, Deep-dive
Bengaluru | Aug 8, 2019
IISc researchers discern how a protein causes chronic nerve pain

Researchers from the Indian Institute of Science (IISc), Bengaluru study how a protein called lysozyme, an integral component of our immune system, causes persistent nerve pain during nerve injury.

General, Science, Health, Society, Deep-dive
Bengaluru | Aug 2, 2019
Pitter Patterns: IISc study finds increase in area receiving extreme rainfall in the last four decades

Researchers from the Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru, have used a non-traditional method to measure extreme rainfall events. This approach is more accurate than what is currently used by meteorologists and researchers.

General, Science, Deep-dive
Bengaluru | Jul 24, 2019
Researchers discover a new species of vine snake from the Western Ghats that dates back 26 million years

The team of researchers, from the Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru were attempting to study and classify snakes in the Western Ghats systematically. That's when they came across Proahaetulla antiqua, which is endemic to the southern Western Ghats. What's more interesting is that it is an ancient species, thought to have evolved around 26 million years ago during the mid-Oligocene. 

General, Science, Ecology, Deep-dive
Bengaluru | Jul 23, 2019
Researchers show how machine learning could solve our power woes

Researchers from IISc, Bengaluru and IBM Research-India have developed a machine learning-based technique to manage the demand and supply of power in a network of microgrids while maximising profit. Since such local grids can run on renewable sources of energy instead of relying on fossil fuels, they also reduce carbon emissions and are sustainable.

General, Science, Technology, Deep-dive
Bengaluru | Jul 15, 2019
A team of Indian scientists, working with collaborators from Singapore, Australia and France, have shown how clusters of circulating tumour cells—cancer cells that have sloughed off the tumour and are circulating in the blood—could help monitor the response to cancer treatments and predict a patient's survival chances using a simple blood test.

A team of Indian scientists, working with collaborators from Singapore, Australia and France, have shown how clusters of circulating tumour cells—cancer cells that have sloughed off the tumour and are circulating in the blood—could help monitor the response to cancer treatments and predict a patient's survival chances using a simple blood test. 

General, Science, Health, Deep-dive
Bengaluru | Jul 2, 2019
IISc researchers use mathematics to crack down on drug-resistant hepatitis C virus

Researchers from the IISc, Bengaluru, propose a mathematical model that can determine the number of mutations the hepatitis C virus can carry in an infected individual, even before starting any treatment.

General, Science, Health, Deep-dive
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