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Science

Mar 23

One of the greatest threats to biodiversity is the fragmentation or breaking apart of habitats. Climate change, volcanic eruptions and other geological processes can gradually modify the area in which a species finds food, shelter, and mates. By natural selection and adaptation, speciation occurs, adding to the richness of life. Conversely, human activities of deforestation, agriculture and urbanisation have accelerated habitat loss to such a degree that species are unable to adapt to the changes, leading to ecosystem decay and, ultimately, extinction.

General, Science, Ecology, Scitoons, SciQs
Mumbai | Mar 22
Soil tells the Meteor Story

Researchers from IIT Bombay and Archaeological Survey of India, Aurangabad studied soil from the Lonar lake and found that the materials from the meteor had a significant impact on the native soil.

General, Science, Deep-dive
New Delhi | Mar 21
Too hot to work? It’s the warming climate to blame and that’s threatening crops too

Researchers from IIT Delhi have found that variations in temperature affect crop production and worker efficiency—two crucial pillars of India’s economy.

General, Science, Ecology, News
Mumbai | Mar 20
Methods of Archimedes and Bhāskara to Help Teaching

Researchers compare how the Greek and Indian mathematicians measured the surface area of a sphere.

General, Science, Society, Deep-dive
Bengaluru | Mar 19
India’s computer science graduates: High in quantity and low in quality, finds study | Research Matters

A new study, by researchers from the US, China, India and Russia, has compared the quality of computer science graduates from these four countries. 

General, Science, Engineering, Society, Policy, Deep-dive
Bengaluru | Mar 19
Uncovering the gentle giants: The difference in the personalities of male and female Asian elephants

Researchers from the University of Turku, Finland describe some interesting differences in the personalities of male and female Asian elephants.

General, Science, Ecology, News
Bengaluru | Mar 18
Majority of deaths among children aged 5–14 years in India preventable, says study

In a recent study, researchers from Canada, Brazil, China, Mexico, India and Switzerland have tried to uncover the reasons behind this alarming statistic by analysing the causes of deaths in these children from India, China, Brazil, and Mexico. These countries have an estimated 40% of kids aged 5-14 years and report an estimated 200,000 deaths annually at these ages. The findings of their study were published in the journal The Lancet.

General, Science, Health, Society, Policy, News
Mar 16

As kids we were fascinated seeing magnets and its property of attracting iron towards it. We always had these questions in our mind - Why does iron get attracted by the magnet, unlike other materials such as wood or plastic? What is so strange about iron? To find the answer, we have to understand a bit about magnetic properties of materials.

General, Science, Scitoons, SciQs
Bengaluru | Mar 15
IISc researchers develop a smartphone-based screening application for glaucoma

This week, from the 10th to the 16th of March, is observed as the World Glaucoma Week globally, to spread awareness of glaucoma—a group of eye conditions that damage the optic nerve and lead to total blindness if left untreated. Glaucoma is the second leading cause of blindness in the world accounting for upto 8% of total blindness.

General, Science, Technology, Health, Society, News
Chandigarh | Mar 15
About half a lakh measles-related deaths averted in India due to vaccination programs, says study

Researchers from the University of Toronto, Canada, King George’s Medical University, Lucknow, the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, and the Indian Council of Medical Research have analysed the impact of the national measles immunisation campaign in India.

General, Science, Health, Society, Deep-dive