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Ecology

Bengaluru | Mar 19, 2020
Numbers mean strength, in a dog’s world too

A new study by researchers at the Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER) Kolkata, shows that dogs too have developed strategies to coexist with humans, and numbers play a role in it. 

General, Science, Ecology, Society, Deep-dive
Bengaluru | Mar 18, 2020
On a search for tough trees for rough Indian roads

Vehicular exhaust is a significant cause of air pollution in India, resulting in the rise of many fatal respiratory illnesses.

General, Science, Ecology, Society, Policy, Deep-dive
Bengaluru | Mar 11, 2020
In Gir, not sharing is caring for the lions and leopards

Researchers explore how the two predators coexist by preferring different habitats in Gir

General, Science, Ecology, Deep-dive
Bengaluru | Mar 3, 2020
Fish school by intrinsic randomness reveals a new study by researchers at IISc

Understanding patterns in nature has been of interest to researchers. Some of the popular questions have been around why birds flock together, how groups of bees build their honeycombs out of perfect hexagons, how ants navigate finding the shortest path back to the nest, and the likes. Researchers across the world are trying to decipher and explain how and why such specific patterns emerge.

General, Science, Ecology, News
Bengaluru | Feb 20, 2020
An accurate count of Asiatic lions could help design better conservation practices

A new study proposes an improved approach to determine lion densities and identify factors that affect their abundance, but there may be flaws say some.

General, Science, Ecology, Deep-dive
Bengaluru | Feb 17, 2020
Among dwindling numbers, some bright spots for India’s birds

Powered by citizen science, the State of India’s Birds report calls for conservation efforts to save India’s aves.

General, Science, Ecology, Society, Policy, Deep-dive
Bengaluru | Feb 12, 2020
How accurate are India’s tiger numbers?

According to the National Tiger Estimation survey, the number of tigers has surged to 2967, indicating a doubling of tiger numbers since the first survey conducted in 2006 under a revised monitoring methodology. Although this change may sound exciting to the layperson, some scientists have flagged concerns about accepting these claimed changes in tiger numbers. In a recent study, published in the journal Conservation Science and Practice, researchers from India and Norway refer to important mathematical, statistical and ecological principles and highlight how India’s tiger survey results deviate from these principles.

General, Science, Ecology, Policy, Deep-dive
Bengaluru | Feb 11, 2020
Toxic elements, released since the Industrial Revolution, find their way to the Himalayas

In the 18th and 19th century, Britain was abuzz with cranking steam engines, rattling power looms, and clattering machines. Amidst this daily ding, the world was witnessing a defining movement in human history—the Industrial Revolution—that soon spread to the rest of Western Europe. Powered by coal, the production of most things transitioned from hand to machine, spurring a rise in population and air pollution. For the next two centuries, London became infamous for its soot and smog, which turned fatal for about 12,000 people. Now, a new study has shown that this mal air has left its trace in the lofty Himalayan glaciers, thousands of kilometres away from Europe.

General, Science, Ecology, Deep-dive
Bengaluru | Feb 4, 2020
Dams are dividing the world’s fish habitats, and India is one of the most affected

In a new study, an international team of researchers have found that large dams have heavily fragmented fish population across the world. Published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the study assessed about ten thousand species of fish worldwide affected by around 40,000 existing dams and 3,700 upcoming dams worldwide. The findings reveal that fish habitats are most disconnected in the United States, Europe, South Africa, India, and China. The proposed dams are poised to further worsen fish habitat connectivity in tropical watersheds like the Amazon, Congo, Mekong and Salween.

General, Science, Ecology, Policy, Deep-dive
Bengaluru | Jan 28, 2020
Mystery river snail reveals dispersal events into Indian subregion

Mud snails, also known as mystery snails, live in freshwater and belong to a snail family called Viviparidae. They are found throughout the world except in South America and Antarctica. Such globally distributed species incite interesting questions about their dispersal across different continents. In a recent study, researchers in Bengaluru from the Ashoka Trust for Research in Ecology and the Environment (ATREE) and the Indian Institute of Science (IISc), investigated manifestation of these mystery snails in India.

General, Science, Ecology, Deep-dive
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