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IITK

New Delhi | May 10, 2018

Delhi, the city once famous for the charm of the Red Fort and the elegance of Qutub Minar, is today infamous for its pollution crisis. Ranked one of the most polluted cities in the world, the air in the city is taking a toll on its residents’ health. With over 10 million vehicles registered in Delhi, it is not surprising that the air is turning toxic. But how bad is the air really in the roads of Delhi?

General, Science, Health, Policy, News
Kanpur | Apr 5, 2018

Scientist from Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur (IITK) have developed a novel ternary nanocomposite (compound made of three different nano compounds) which can remove methylene blue from a solution when shone with visible or Ultra Violet (UV) light.

General, Science, Technology, News
Kanpur | Apr 4, 2018
Illustration : Purabi Deshpande / Research Matters

Scientists from the Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur, devise a new method to make chemotherapy safer and easier with the help of liposomes.

General, Science, Technology, Health, Deep-dive
Kanpur | Mar 23, 2018

In a new study, researchers have developed a low-cost and eco-friendly method to extract gold from electronic waste using the leaves of the plant Lagerstroemia speciosa, commonly called the Pride of India. They have applied the principle of biosorption—the ability of biological materials in an aqueous solution to bind with heavy metals—to extract gold from wastewater.

General, Science, Technology, News
Kanpur | Feb 19, 2018

Researchers from Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur have come up with a potential roadmap to control diesel engine pollution, by looking at the different techniques available to curb emissions from a diesel engine.

General, Science, Technology, News
Kanpur | Nov 21, 2017

When energy is supplied to a fluid, it flows. As this energy is increased the flow becomes turbulent. If the energy is provided through heat, we see buoyancy driven turbulence, where the hotter fluid rises to the top and colder fluid moves to the bottom. A conjecture that explained such buoyancy driven turbulent flows may now be overturned. New insights gained in a study using one the world’s most powerful supercomputer could help better explain such flows. 

General, Science, Technology
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