Researchers at IIT Bombay discover the role of environmental resources, genes and mating in species in the development of new species in the same area, challenging the traditional view that new species can develop only in distinct geographies.

malaria

Bombay
19 Jan 2021

Researchers use proteomics & machine learning to identify group of proteins to gauge severity of malaria

Bengaluru
12 Nov 2020

Scientists have successfully grown Indian isolates of P. vivax in different types of human liver cells.

Bengaluru
10 Jan 2019

Researchers from IISc, Bengaluru, and the Kerala Forest Department, have reported the presence of the human malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, in two species of Indian monkeys.

 

Bengaluru
15 May 2018

Higher altitudes have lower levels of oxygen, and hence animals living at such altitudes have to adapt. Having higher content of haemoglobin is one adaptation strategy used. In a recent study, scientists from the Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, explore how blood parasite affect these high altitude birds.

10 Aug 2017

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Mosquito borne diseases like malaria and dengue are still rampant and have posed a great challenge to mankind. We have lost several lives in our war against mosquitoes, and scramble new ways to fight them. Now, researchers are working to genetically engineer the genes of mosquitoes using the technique of RNA interference, where an RNA is artificially inserted to disturb the normal functions of mosquito cells, thereby killing them in the process. This process, they claim, is environmentally friendly and most effective compared to existing strategies.

28 Jun 2017

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Malaria, a deadly mosquito borne disease, kills about half a million people around the world, every year. Developing countries face a challenge in accurately diagnosing malaria in early stages due to the need of sophisticated diagnostic devices and skill. A new study at IISc has developed a technique to test for malaria with very small quantities of blood samples using laser light. By holding a single RBC using a pair of 'optical tweezers', this technique can detect malarial parasites in the RBCs even at an early stage, say the researchers. The researchers claim this technique can help save many lives if commercialised on a larger scale. 

13 Jun 2017

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Migration of birds is a fascinating story. Many birds across the world travel to different locations in search of food and a warm place to breed. A new study has now found a dark side of the fascinating tale of migration -- the risk of spread of diseases. The researchers have studied two species of migratory birds and have identified the presence of two strains of parasites in them that could potentially spread the disease to the local bird population, which do not have the required immunity to fight against them. The researchers warn that their finding could put the entire local bird population at the risk of contracting the diseases.