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NCBS

Bengaluru | Jul 14, 2020
Understanding the basis of the amazing association between butterflies and ants

For what would a butterfly depend on ants? A recent study explores a complex relationship between an ant and a butterfly.

General, Science, Technology, Ecology, Deep-dive
Mumbai | Jul 1, 2020
Tracing the origins of Parkinson’s disease

Researchers from the Indian Institute of Technology Bombay (IIT Bombay), National Centre of Biological Sciences (NCBS) Bengaluru, Anna University, Chennai and ETH, Zurich uncover the molecular events that lead up to the formation of protein clusters commonly seen in Parkinson’s disease.

 

General, Science, Technology, Health, Deep-dive
Bengaluru | Jun 24, 2020
Researchers find three new species of geckos lurking under granite rocks in the Mysore Plateau

In a recent study, herpetologists have discovered three new species of geckos belonging to the genus Cnemaspis. These geckos are thought to be endemic to the rocky granite boulders found in the Mysore plateau region of Karnataka.

 

General, Science, Ecology, Deep-dive
Bengaluru | Jun 11, 2020
Agriocnemis pygmaea [Image credits: Shantanu Joshi]

In nature, colours are everywhere! Insects, birds, and mammals—all of them have vibrant colours and patterns on their bodies, which not only make them look pretty but play a role in behaviour and survival. Some use their kaleidoscopic looks to attract mates and stand out from their background; others prefer a dull look to blend into their surroundings and hide from predators. In some insects, like a few damselflies, males and females are differently coloured. Since the males mostly initiate mating in these insects, this difference in colours helps them to find a mate. A new study has now explored how colours impact the mating behaviour of a species of damselfly, Agriocnemis pygmaea.

General, Science, Ecology, Deep-dive
Bengaluru | May 20, 2020
First-ever study in India investigates a rare type of cancer caused by a virus

In the first-ever study from India, researchers at the National Centre for Biological Sciences (NCBS), Bengaluru and the Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai, have analysed how prevalent the Merkel Cell Polyomavirus (MCV) is in India. 

General, Science, Health, Society, Deep-dive
Bengaluru | May 19, 2020
Using virtual reality to understand how insects fly

Study uses three-dimensional simulations to understand how flying insects navigate their terrain

General, Science, Technology, Ecology, Deep-dive
Bengaluru | May 4, 2020
Meet Salazar’s pit viper – a new snake species named after the parseltongue wizard

Salazar Slytherin – the parseltongue wizard who talks with snakes in J.K. Rowling’s fantasy Harry Potter is not just a mystical character name of the Potterverse anymore! Now, its found a place in India’s biodiversity as a newly discovered pit viper from Arunachal Pradesh has been named after this character. 

General, Science, Ecology, Deep-dive
Bengaluru | Dec 24, 2019
Fostered by frost for years, shola grasslands now threatened by invasive plants and the warming climate

In a recent study, researchers explore the effects of frost and freezing temperatures, a characteristic feature of montane shola-grassland ecosystems, on the native and non-native trees of these forests.

General, Science, Ecology, Deep-dive
Bengaluru | Nov 5, 2019
Study explores how blood parasites spread among birds in the Western Ghats

Avian malaria or bird malaria has been linked to significant declines in captive and wild birds, such as penguins and Hawaiian forest birds. Common blood parasites, like Plasmodium that spread through mosquitoes and Haemoproteus that are transmitted through louse flies and biting midges, cause the disease in birds.

General, Science, Ecology, Health, Deep-dive
Bengaluru | Nov 1, 2019
On the edge: Bats in northeast India found to carry filoviruses that could spread to humans

Sometime in the middle of October each year, the Bomrr clan in Nagaland rush to the caves in Mimi village. With a good stock of burning firewood, men and women are ready for the bat harvest festival—an annual ritual where anywhere between 7,000 to 25,000 bats are suffocated or smashed to their deaths. These bats, the clan believes, have medicinal properties and can cure diseases like diarrhoea and body ache, and increase vigour. Now, a new study has shown that these bats, rather than being a cure to diseases, carry deadly filoviruses that could infect humans.

General, Science, Health, Society, Deep-dive, Friday Features
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