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Guwahati | Aug 2

Researchers from CSIR – Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology (CCMB), Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati and MNR Dental College & Hospital, Hyderabad have developed an electrochemical nanobiosensor that can efficiently diagnose invasive aspergillosis

General, Science, Health, Deep-dive
Dec 26

Pushpa Mittra Bhargava was born in Ajaymeru in Rajasthan on 22nd February 1928, to Ram Chandra Bhargava, a medical doctor, and Gayatri Bhargava. He was homeschooled until about the age ten, by his grandfather, after which he was directly admitted to class 9 in Varanasi. Having completing his Master’s in organic chemistry from Queens College, one of the best institutions in Uttar Pradesh back then, Bhargava joined Lucknow University for his Ph.D. By age 21, he was armed with a PhD in synthetic chemistry.  

General, Science
Dec 26
Infographic : Purabi Deshpande / Research Matters

Dr. Lalji Singh was born in the small village of Kalwari in Jaunpur district of Uttar Pradesh on 5th July 1947, to a farmer and head of village, Suryanarayan Singh. With no higher education facilities in his village, Lalji strived for an education early on, travelling to a nearby village to complete his schooling and joining the reputed Banaras Hindu University. After completing his undergraduate and postgraduate degrees from BHU, Lalji was admitted for his PhD in the same university.

General, Science
Mar 15

Autophagy, or self-eating, is a process where cells in our body devour some of the cell components to replenish their nutrient supply during severe shortage.  This process, though sounds gruesome, is essential for our survival and any defect in this mechanism could lead to neurodegenerative disorders like Parkinson’s disease. Several research, inspired by Nobel Laureate Prof. Yoshinori Ohsumi’s work on autophagy, has now uncovered new dimensions on our understanding of how cells function.

General, Science, Health, Featured
Feb 27

Protein Synthesis Machinery in an Eukaryotic Cell

Scientists have unearthed a natural biochemical entity from our own body, called microRNAs that could soon become a coveted tool in our disease-fighting arsenal. With the dawn of the genomic era, our fight against major diseases is increasingly getting channelized towards acquiring a fresh perspective of disease metabolism and consequently devising newer molecular strategies to combat these diseases. MicroRNAs (or miRNA) are one such new kid on the block, which have completely changed our perspective towards designing disease therapeutics. MicroRNAs are tiny RNA molecules that were once thought to be a waste product of our protein-producing machinery. Made of the same building blocks as our DNA, these pygmy RNA molecules could very well be the answer to curing diseases like cancer, diabetes, viral infections, genetic defects & many other metabolic disorders.

General, Science, Health, Featured