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Frog

Bengaluru | Jun 11, 2019
Meet Micryletta aishani, the new frog from the northeast that plays hide-and-seek with monsoon

The monsoon is here; humming with the pouring rain are the croaks of frogs, for it is the season of love for most of them. But not for Micryletta aishani, the newest of the frogs discovered from the state of Assam. Unlike most frogs that breed during the monsoon, this elusive frog breeds before the onset of monsoon and then goes into hiding for the rest of the year. The discovery is the result of six years of extensive fieldwork in the northeastern states of India by a team of researchers from the University of Delhi, Wildlife Institute of India, Indonesian Institute of Sciences and the University of Texas at Arlington, USA. 

General, Science, Ecology
New Delhi | Feb 14, 2019
New secretive frog species discovered in a roadside puddle in Southern India | SD Biju

The forests of the Western Ghats, a biodiversity hotspot of India, have been revealing several new species of amphibians and reptiles in the recent years. This time, however, amphibian researchers from the University of Delhi have discovered a new frog species which was hiding in plain sight in a roadside puddle in Southern India.

General, Science, Ecology, Deep-dive
Pune | Jan 16, 2019

The year 2018 was exciting for herpetologists in India as over 20 new species of frogs and geckos were discovered here. As we ring in 2019, the excitement continues to live on as researchers from Pune’s Savitribai Phule Pune University and the Zoological Survey of India, Kolkata, have discovered a new species of cricket frog from the northern Western Ghats in Maharashtra.

General, Science, Ecology, Deep-dive
Bengaluru | Dec 19, 2018
Photo: Microhyla darreli by S. D. Biju

In a recent study, researchers have reported the discovery of yet another species of frog in the Western Ghats of Kerala. This species, named Microhyla darreli belongs to the genus Microhyla, commonly known as narrow-mouthed frogs because of their triangular-shaped body and pointed snout. The frogs of this genus are widely distributed through Japan, China, India, Sri Lanka and Southeast Asia.

General, Science, Ecology, News
Dehradun | Jun 8, 2018
Photo : Prudvi Raj

Researchers from the Wildlife Institute of India (WII), Zoological Survey of India (ZSI) and North Orissa University discover two new species of frog.

General, Science, Deep-dive
Mangaluru | May 22, 2018
Photo: Vineeth Kumar K

After the Microhyla laterite that was described from Manipal in 2016, scientists have found another new narrow-mouthed frog from the city centre of Mangaluru, in coastal Karnataka. 

General, Science, Ecology, News
Delhi | May 16, 2018
Photo : Vidisha Kulkarni / Research Matters

A new study by scientists from Technische Universität Braunschweig, Germany, University of Delhi, Delhi, India, Hiroshima University, Japan, Bangamata Sheikh Fazilatunnesa Mujib, Bangladesh, Sorbonne Universités, France, and North-West University, South Africa has modified the classification of Asian frogs of the genus Fejervarya and related genera from the family Dicroglossidae.

General, Science, Ecology, News
Delhi | Mar 7, 2018
Photo : Uperodon variegatus by Seshadri K S

The Western Ghats in India and Sri Lanka are well known biodiversity hotspots, with a rich diversity of amphibian species. Both these regions have high density of amphibian endemism, which means that many of the species of amphibians found here are found nowhere else on Earth. Over 85% of amphibian species found in Sri Lanka are endemic, making this island nation have the highest amphibian endemism in Asia.

General, Science, Ecology, News
Aug 29, 2017

The Western Ghats in India has been a hotspot for many a diverse and unique forms of life. The dense rainforests and tropical climate have assisted in the diversification of species, many of which are yet to be found. The latest addition to this growing list is Nasikabatrachus bhupathi, an underground dwelling frog that surface only for a few days every year, to mate. The species was found along the eastern slopes of the Western Ghats, which receives rainfall during the northeast monsoon unlike the other parts of the ghats, and could be a primary reason for the differences in the species found in the different places. 

General, Science, Ecology