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Graphene

Mumbai | Oct 9
Photo: Arati Halbe, Gubbi Labs Component images by: pxHere and UCL Mathematical & Physical Sciences via flickr

Researchers from IIT Bombay fabricate highly efficient transistors using graphene nanoribbons.

General, Science, Technology, Deep-dive
Mumbai | Aug 21
Photo : AlexanderAIUS (Wikimedia Commons)

Scientists from IIT Bombay devise a method to grow nanographene on copper using atomic hydrogen at lower temperatures.

General, Science, Deep-dive
Bengaluru | May 28

Researchers at Raman Research Institute, Bengaluru, are exploring the properties of single walled carbon nanotube (CNT) immersed in aqueous triblock copolymer solution. The newly formed CNT-polymer hybrid could replace the use of carbon nanotubes by itself, thanks to its remarkable mechanical, thermal and electrical properties.

General, Science, Technology, News
Mohali | Feb 21
Figure: Conversion of peanut shells into peanut shell derived - few layers of graphene (PS-FLG). Source: Dr. Ramendra Sundar Dey, INST Mohali, Punjab.

Graphene is called the ‘wonder material’ due to its electrical and mechanical properties and is now evolving as an alternative to conventional energy storage devices like batteries and supercapacitors. Researchers from Institute of Nano Science and Technology (INST), Mohali, use peanut shells to manufacture high-quality graphene nanosheets.

General, Science, Technology, Society, Deep-dive
Bengaluru | Nov 23
Illustration : Purabi Deshpande / Research Matters

Graphene is a form of carbon, just like diamond and graphite. It is made of a honeycomb shaped sheet of single layer of carbon atoms. Researchers from the Indian Institute of Science and University of Alabama have studied this material for its property of conducting electricity. Their study indicates that electrons can flow easily on the edges of graphene making it a very good conductor of electricity. 

General, Science
Mar 29

Graphene, also called a “wonder material” is increasingly being used in the field of electronics due to its lightweight and electrical properties. Now, researchers at the Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, have identified a potential drawback in graphene transistors that have metal contact leads. The metal atoms in the contacts react with graphene atoms, creating an unwanted disturbance or noise in the electronic circuit. This discovery may have major implications on using graphene for futuristic electronic applications.  

General, Science, Technology