Sphaerotheca varshaabhu is a newly discovered species of burrowing frog from urban Bengaluru.

City

Bengaluru
8 Apr 2022

Complexity theory offers opportunities for understanding these systems holistically

Mumbai
25 Nov 2021

A study finds that the rapidly expanding land use of Mumbai is driving the region’s remaining wildlife into the remnant forest fringes.

Bengaluru
17 Oct 2019

Projected to be the third fastest-growing city in the world, Bengaluru's transformation from being the 'Garden City' to the 'Silicon Valley of India' has made it the modern face of the Indian economy. But all this development has come at a cost with the city losing 89% of its green cover in just forty years. Once known for its cool climate, it is now infamous for its horrible traffic and concrete buildings. Middle-class ghettos and affluent gated communities have replaced the famed lakes, and the gardens have been cleared for IT parks. Thanks to the exponential growth, poor urban planning and corruption, experts believe that the city is going to be unlivable in a few years. In a recent study, published in the journal Remote Sensing Application: Society and Environment, researchers at the Department of Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences, University of Albany, State University of New York, have explored the impact of increased urbanisation on Bengaluru. 

Mumbai
20 Mar 2018

Study from IIT Bombay explores whether the problem of affordable housing in urban India is resolved through Satellite town near metropolises. 

Bengaluru
30 Jul 2018

Research from the National Institute of Advanced Studies and University of Cambridge helps us understand better of Macaques live in urban habitats.

Bengaluru
11 Jun 2018

Scientists at the Indian Institute of Science (IISc), Bengaluru have developed a data driven software platform that can efficiently manage Internet of Things (IoT) resources and applications. The software, if commercialized, could be employed for efficient management of smart cities.

19 Sep 2017

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Bangalore of the yesteryears was a city of gardens; cool, pleasant and green. In addition to the 2000+ species of trees -- some natural and some specifically planted -- individual gardens in small households contributed to the large biodiversity here. The undulating terrain of the city allowed formation of lakes -- natural and manmade – that were interconnected. As the ‘Garden City’ transformed into the ‘Silicon Valley of India’, the city’s rapid, uncontrolled growth turned this biodiversity haven to a concrete jungle.