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Bengaluru | Apr 24, 2020
Single-scale and multiscale diffusion

Modern science reveals that matter is made of atoms and molecules. Molecules in liquids and gases move randomly; there is an average distance between two nearest molecules. This distance is used to model the properties of the gas. However, there are certain problems, like  turbulence, that cannot be solved using just the distance, which is a single scale. We need to consider all scales from large to small. Such systems are called multiscale systems. 

General, Science, Technology, Deep-dive, Friday Features
Bengaluru | Apr 21, 2020

Research Matters is happy to bring you this article as part of the series on Mathematical Modeling and Data Analysis by the Mathematical Modeling team of Indian Scientists' Response to Covid-19 (ISRC). The first part of this series is on Explaining Models of Epidemic Spreading.

Why do we need Mathematical Models for CoVID-19?

General, Science, Technology, Engineering, Ecology, Health, Society, Policy, Deep-dive
Bengaluru | Apr 20, 2020
Capturing complex chemical reactions on video

New theoretical work demonstrates how sequentially captured images of electrons can be used to show the evolution of electron movement

 

General, Science, Technology, Engineering, Deep-dive
Bengaluru | Apr 17, 2020
Image credit : NASA Goddard Space Flight Center via (CC BY 2.0)

To understand an extensive, complex physical system, thinkers break it up into smaller components and try to understand the properties of the most minor microscopic components. This method helps us understand many complicated things around us, and has helped us solve a lot of real-world problems. But it does not help us understand certain phenomena, such as turbulence in fluids. A different way of thinking, a method that considers the physical system as a whole is needed in such cases. This method is called the multiscale analysis.

General, Science, Technology, Engineering, Deep-dive, Friday Features
Bengaluru | Apr 16, 2020
 Making sense of sound - Digital Audio Processing Lab at IIT Bombay

Humans communicate a lot non-verbally, thanks to the ability of our brain to understand tone. Would computers be able to do this? Currently capable of understanding plain text, they are struggling to learn the emotions behind the words, conveyed through tone. But these machines are catching up fast. Digital audio processing tools equip computers to understand various information in sound, including emotions.Prof Preeti Rao of the Indian Institute of Technology Bombay is an expert in sound processing—an approach that helps us do various useful things, one of which is removing unwanted sounds (or noise) from an audio clip. With her team at the Digital Audio Processing Lab, Prof Rao attempts to understand the nature of sound, reveal the information it may hold, and use it for, say, identifying tracks, melodies or the raga of a song.

General, Science, Technology, Engineering, Deep-dive, News
Bengaluru | Apr 13, 2020
Mini-fuel engines could replace batteries in the future

Scientists around the world have been actively looking for eco-friendly alternatives to conventional chemical-based batteries. In one such effort, researchers at the Indian Institute of Technology Bombay (IIT Bombay) have designed a micro-combustor that is efficient and environment-friendly. The study, funded by the Science and Engineering Board (SERB) and Department of Science and Technology (DST), has been published in various journals including Applied Physics Letters, Energy Conversion and Management, and Applied Energy.

General, Science, Technology, Engineering, Deep-dive
Bengaluru | Apr 10, 2020
Flattening the much-talked COVID-19 curve—How close are we in India?

In a recent effort, researchers at IIT - Kanpur have worked on answering about the approaches to flatten the epidemic curve.

General, Science, Health, Society, Policy, Deep-dive
Bengaluru | Apr 10, 2020
The crown that drove the world into a frenzy: Understanding the infection mechanism of novel coronavirus

 The novel coronavirus — termed SARS-CoV-2 — belongs to a family of viruses that target and infect the upper respiratory tract of mammals. At least six types of coronaviruses are known to infect humans that cause common cold. Scientists have reported the existence of coronaviruses in bats and birds dating back to millions of years ago. They believe that the cross-species transmission is more of a recent event.

General, Science, Health, Society, Policy, Deep-dive
Bengaluru | Apr 6, 2020
Insights from Optics for Better Thermoelectric Devices

New design in thermoelectric devices can increase both output power and efficiency

A significant problem in electronic devices is the generation of heat during their operation. This phenomenon not only leads to the wastage of electric power but can also damage the device. Thermoelectric materials, which convert heat to electricity and vice versa, can be used to turn the generated heat back into electricity, thereby saving power and avoiding overheating of the device.

General, Science, Technology, Engineering, Deep-dive
Bengaluru | Apr 3, 2020
Statistics and the non-scientist: The need for communicating uncertainty

In an earlier episode of The Joy of Science Shambhavi Chidambaram spoke to Professor Shravan Vasishth about, among other things, the joy of psycholinguistics. In this interview, Professor Vasishth talks in detail about teaching statistics and the need to understand uncertainty both to students and the general public. He is the author of “Shravan Vasishth’s Slog”, a blog about statistics. This interview has been edited for clarity and conciseness and has been run past Prof Vasishth for accuracy before publication.

General, Science, Deep-dive, Friday Features, Joy of Science
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