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Health

Thiruvananthapuram | Nov 28, 2017
Illustration : Purabi Deshpande / Research Matters

Cervical cancer plagues the life of many women around the globe. Sometimes the disease can be caused by an aggravated and repeated infection by the Human papilloma virus (HPV). Researchers from the Cancer Research Program, Rajiv Gandhi Centre for Biotechnology (RGCB) in Kerala, use gene editing molecules rid the virus of the genes, which form a protein that can cause malignancy in humans.

General, Science, Technology, Health
Hyderabad | Nov 24, 2017
Photo : Dr. Venuganti's Lab

From their first appearance on the academic scene as a tool for dissection to making it into mainstream medicine and cosmetics in the recent years, microneedles have an array of applications. Dr.Venuganti and a team of researchers from the Birla Institute of Technology and Science, Hyderabad and the US Food and Drug Administration, recount the journey microneedles have made through the years and the range of possible applications in the future.

General, Science, Health, Featured
Jul 17, 2017

The human body harbours around 100 trillion microbes (bacteria, virus and others). While some harm us, others help us in different ways. A new study has now analysed the microbes present in our blood and has found that from an evolutionary perspective, they are related to each other, and strangely, even related to humans. This discovery has implications in drug discovery and designing therapies against harmful microbial infections.

General, Science, Health, Society
Apr 25, 2017

Malaria, the biggest killer of all time, has a long association with humans. As we develop new strategies to combat the fatal disease, the parasite causing the disease gets stronger than ever. In this seemingly never-ending tussle, who ultimately wins the battle? The judgement, it seems, is not an easy one! On World Malaria Day, here is a brief insight into the details of this deadly disease. 

General, Science, Health, Society, Featured
Mar 1, 2017

Technology has revolutionised medicine in the past century. We now have imaging methodologies like X-rays, Computed Tomography (CT) scans and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) allowing us a look inside the body without cutting it open. Nanotechnology seems poised to write the next chapter of this revolution, with various applications in biomedical imaging, diagnosis and effective treatment of diseases. In yet another advancement in this direction, an interdisciplinary team of scientists from Materials Engineering Department and Department of Microbiology and Cell Biology at the Indian Institute of Science (IISc), Bangalore, have synthesised iron nanoparticles without any oxide cover that could be used to enhance the sensitivity of MRI by producing images with better contrast. They have also demonstrated the potential application of this research in the targeted delivery of medicines and other biological molecules to specific organs in the body.

 

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