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JNCASR

Bengaluru | Jan 7
Annie Santamaria/ Research Matters

Researchers at the NCBS, Bengaluru, studied how Swallowtails evolves and changes its appearance and colour at various stages of its elaborate life cycle to develop their colour defence strategies.

 

General, Science, Ecology, Deep-dive
Bengaluru | Jan 3
Clockwise from left: Ravi Shankar Nanjundiah (IISC), Arun Kumar (IISc), Subi J George (JNCASR), Sandeep K (TIFR-CAM), G D Veerappa Gowda (TIFR-CAM), Justin David (IISc), Utpal Nath (IISc), Shalabh Bhatnagar (IISc)

In a recent announcement made by the Indian Academy of Sciences, Bangalore, 23 scientists from across the country have been elected as Fellows of the Academy. The list contains nine scientists from Bengaluru, with five from the Indian Institute of Science, two from TIFR Centre for Applicable Mathematics and one each from National Institute of Mental Health & Neurosciences (NIMHANS) and Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research (JNCASR).

 

General, Science, Technology, Engineering, Health, News
Bengaluru | Dec 11

If you are a budding researcher with a keen interest in evolution and biology, the Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research (JNCASR) has some good news for you. The multidisciplinary research institute in Bengaluru is all set to host the first-ever 15-day school in Evolutionary Biology. It is planned to be held from 12–26 March 2019 and is sponsored by the Science and Engineering Research Board (SERB).

General, Science, Ecology, News
Bengaluru | Apr 12

Scientists from Indian Institute of Science (IISc) and Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research (JNCASR) have demonstrated a new type of 3 dimensional imaging platform, called iLIFE, that provide detailed images of biological specimen flowing in a fluid.

General, Science, News
Bengaluru | Jan 2

Scientists from the Jawaharlal Nehru Center for Advanced Scientific Research explore whether seasonal variation in abundance of food and water have any effects on the size of elephant groups. The researchers found that although group sizes were larger in the dry season compared to the wet season at the population level, that was not so at the clan level.

General, Science, Ecology
May 8

Conserving wildlife seems to be the biggest concern for most ecologists who think habitat destruction, coupled with climate change, can spell doom for many animals on earth. The first step to know how badly a particular species is affected is by counting them. As simple as it sounds, counting populations, especially in the wild, is a daunting task. In addition to the sheer physical strain, social structures of certain animals like the elephants could result in errors in such population estimations. Now, a new study has leveraged the power of computer simulations to accurately estimate wild populations at the comfort of your desk. 

General, Science, Technology, Ecology