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Bengaluru | Dec 28
Illustration : Purabi Deshpande / Research Matters

2017 had been an eventful year for science all over the world. We have seen tremendous breakthroughs like the detection of gravitational waves, along with many discoveries and inventions that take us a step closer to making out lives better. Here we present snapshots of the remarkable contributions made to science in 2017.

General, Science, Society
Bengaluru | Dec 27
Illustration : Purabi Deshpande / Research Matters

While the readers picked their choice of stories published on the website for 2017, here are the editors’ pick. Hope you enjoy them!

Whose cup of tea is it – ours or leopards’?

General, Science
Dec 27

2017 has been an eventful year for Indian science. From the discovery of the largest entity in the universe to microscopic particles that could aid medical treatments, we have seen it all. But what did our readers enjoy reading about? Here we present to you the top 20 stories out of the 233 stories published in 2017, that were most enjoyed by Research Matters readers. You can also use the links below to have a second look at your favourite stories. 

We thank all our readers for the support. Join us for more on Science next year! 

General
Dec 26

Born on 26th November, 1926, in Jhang, in undivided Punjab, Dr. Yash Pal was an Indian scientist, educator, science communicator and educationist. After completing his M.Sc. degree in Physics from Panjab University, he moved to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology for his PhD. His areas of specialisation included cosmic rays.

General, Science
Dec 26
Illustration : Purabi Deshpande / Research Matters

Dev Raj Sikka was born on 1st March 1932, in Jhang Maghiana in the undivided Punjab. After completing his M.Sc in physical chemistry from Agra University with a first rank, Sikka began his career in the Indian Meteorological Department in 1954. He later joined the Institute of Tropical Meteorology (known today as Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology), becoming its Director in 1986. 

General, Science
Dec 26

Dr. U R Rao was born on 10th March 1932, at Adamaru in the state of Karnataka. After completing his undergraduate at Anantpur, Rao moved to Banaras HIndu University for his Masters and then to Physical Research Laboratory, Ahmedabad to complete his PhD under  the guidance of Dr. Vikram Sarabhai.

General, Science
Dec 26
Illustration : Purabi Deshpande / Research Matters

C V Vishweshwara or “Vishu” as he was known to all, was born on 6th March 1938, in Karnataka. He finished most of his schooling in Bengaluru and then his graduation in Mysore University. For his PhD, he moved to Columbia University and later to University of Maryland in USA, to work on general relativity. On returning to India, Vishu joined Raman Research Institute in Bengaluru and then later joined the Indian Institute of Astrophysics.     

General, Science
Dec 26

Pushpa Mittra Bhargava was born in Ajaymeru in Rajasthan on 22nd February 1928, to Ram Chandra Bhargava, a medical doctor, and Gayatri Bhargava. He was homeschooled until about the age ten, by his grandfather, after which he was directly admitted to class 9 in Varanasi. Having completing his Master’s in organic chemistry from Queens College, one of the best institutions in Uttar Pradesh back then, Bhargava joined Lucknow University for his Ph.D. By age 21, he was armed with a PhD in synthetic chemistry.  

General, Science
Dec 26
Infographic : Purabi Deshpande / Research Matters

Dr. Lalji Singh was born in the small village of Kalwari in Jaunpur district of Uttar Pradesh on 5th July 1947, to a farmer and head of village, Suryanarayan Singh. With no higher education facilities in his village, Lalji strived for an education early on, travelling to a nearby village to complete his schooling and joining the reputed Banaras Hindu University. After completing his undergraduate and postgraduate degrees from BHU, Lalji was admitted for his PhD in the same university.

General, Science
Dec 23

Whizzing and whirring past us are these insects that most of us remember as ‘helicopters’ of our childhood. Often subjected to our harsh fascination, these winged beauties were tied a string to their bodies, and flown around. Dragonflies and damselflies, collectively known as Odonates, were once as interesting to us as dragons and damsels of stories. Yet today, we barely have the time to notice these creatures.

Infographics, General, Science, Ecology, SciQs

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