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Science

Bengaluru | Apr 29, 2020
A tiger crossing a road in Tadoba National Park, India [Image Credits: Grassjewel / CC BY-SA]

Study finds proposed road construction in the continent could impact tiger populations in 13 countries.

General, Science, Ecology, Society, Policy
Bengaluru | Apr 29, 2020
Poets and Quants

Genius is when someone’s works are so profound that they not only stand the test of time but test the truths of time. It has been 100 years today since Srinivasa Ramanujan was cruelly snatched away at a young age of 32. His works are yet to be fully deciphered.

General, Science, Society, Deep-dive
Bengaluru | Apr 29, 2020
Patterns of mating interactions in wild zebrafish now unravelled

Animal behaviour studies, which began in the 1970s, had a rocky start as they were viewed as a deviation from biological studies. They try to answer questions relating to why an animal's behaviour differs with different organisms and environmental factors, and the cost-benefits associated with each behaviour. Such studies help to understand not only the biology of the organism but also its ecological role. In one such study, Dr Anuradha Bhat and her group at the Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, Kolkata, have looked at the mating behaviour of zebrafish.

 

General, Science, Ecology, Deep-dive
Bengaluru | Apr 28, 2020
SIR and SEIR Models of Infectious Diseases

Research Matters is happy to bring you this article as part of the series on Mathematical Modeling and Data Analysis by the Mathematical Modeling team of Indian Scientists' Response to Covid-19 (ISRC). The second part of this series is on SIR and SEIR Models of Infectious Diseases. 

General, Science, Health, Society, Policy, Deep-dive
Bengaluru | Apr 27, 2020
Paparazzi on the black pepper

Researchers identify molecular markers that can help in developing better varieties of black pepper. 

General, Science, Ecology, Deep-dive
Bengaluru | Apr 24, 2020
Single-scale and multiscale diffusion

Modern science reveals that matter is made of atoms and molecules. Molecules in liquids and gases move randomly; there is an average distance between two nearest molecules. This distance is used to model the properties of the gas. However, there are certain problems, like  turbulence, that cannot be solved using just the distance, which is a single scale. We need to consider all scales from large to small. Such systems are called multiscale systems. 

General, Science, Technology, Deep-dive, Friday Features
Bengaluru | Apr 21, 2020

Research Matters is happy to bring you this article as part of the series on Mathematical Modeling and Data Analysis by the Mathematical Modeling team of Indian Scientists' Response to Covid-19 (ISRC). The first part of this series is on Explaining Models of Epidemic Spreading.

Why do we need Mathematical Models for CoVID-19?

General, Science, Technology, Engineering, Ecology, Health, Society, Policy, Deep-dive
Bengaluru | Apr 20, 2020
Capturing complex chemical reactions on video

New theoretical work demonstrates how sequentially captured images of electrons can be used to show the evolution of electron movement

 

General, Science, Technology, Engineering, Deep-dive
Bengaluru | Apr 17, 2020
Image credit : NASA Goddard Space Flight Center via (CC BY 2.0)

To understand an extensive, complex physical system, thinkers break it up into smaller components and try to understand the properties of the most minor microscopic components. This method helps us understand many complicated things around us, and has helped us solve a lot of real-world problems. But it does not help us understand certain phenomena, such as turbulence in fluids. A different way of thinking, a method that considers the physical system as a whole is needed in such cases. This method is called the multiscale analysis.

General, Science, Technology, Engineering, Deep-dive, Friday Features
Bengaluru | Apr 16, 2020
 Making sense of sound - Digital Audio Processing Lab at IIT Bombay

Humans communicate a lot non-verbally, thanks to the ability of our brain to understand tone. Would computers be able to do this? Currently capable of understanding plain text, they are struggling to learn the emotions behind the words, conveyed through tone. But these machines are catching up fast. Digital audio processing tools equip computers to understand various information in sound, including emotions.Prof Preeti Rao of the Indian Institute of Technology Bombay is an expert in sound processing—an approach that helps us do various useful things, one of which is removing unwanted sounds (or noise) from an audio clip. With her team at the Digital Audio Processing Lab, Prof Rao attempts to understand the nature of sound, reveal the information it may hold, and use it for, say, identifying tracks, melodies or the raga of a song.

General, Science, Technology, Engineering, Deep-dive, News
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